Proper Portions for Your Thanksgiving Feast

Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and while everyone should be looking forward to guilt-free indulgence with friends and family, the aftermath of it all can lead to discomfort, unintended weight gain and the loss of motivation to make healthy eating choices once the holidays are over. Americans typically consume 3,000 to 4,500 calories during the holiday as opposed to the recommended 2,000 calories per day. To prevent this increase in caloric intake, be mindful of how much you are eating and of the nutritional value of the traditional thanksgiving foods we all love and enjoy. Below is a list of the nutritional information and correct portion sizes of the dishes notorious for being on the Thanksgiving dinner table:

Thanksgiving meal guide, meal portion guide, nutritional value, holiday meals, back pain, neck pain, headaches, migraines, at home treatment, movement for neck pain, how to treat chronic pain, physical therapy, surgery alternatives, local physical therpists, mankato, natural pain relief, back pain, neck pain, physical therapists, industrial rehabilitation, sports rehabilitation, sports medicine, running recovery, sports injury, cancer rehabilitation, concussion therapy

Mashed potatoes and gravy. A staple for many Americans during Thanksgiving! Almost all mashed potato recipes consist of whole milk, butter and salt which makes it high in fat. A reasonable portion size for mashed potatoes is 1 cup (268 calories) which contains 44 grams of carbohydrates. Traditional gravy is made of turkey drippings, stock and seasonings. To prevent the high sodium content of gravy which is 250 mg per serving, opt to make it yourself versus buying it in the store. The rule of thumb when it comes to the correct portion size of gravy is ¼ cup which is 25 calories.

Roasted turkey. A cult classic and the main course of a Thanksgiving meal is considered a lean protein with some added fat traditionally from a brine to make the turkey more flavorful. A typical serving size is a range of 3 ½ to 4 oz. of white turkey meat, which has 177 calories, contains little-to-no carbohydrates and is high in protein at 32 grams per serving.

Thanksgiving meal guide, meal portion guide, nutritional value, holiday meals, back pain, neck pain, headaches, migraines, at home treatment, movement for neck pain, how to treat chronic pain, physical therapy, surgery alternatives, local physical therpists, mankato, natural pain relief, back pain, neck pain, physical therapists, industrial rehabilitation, sports rehabilitation, sports medicine, running recovery, sports injury, cancer rehabilitation, concussion therapy

Cranberry sauce. Another favorite at Thanksgiving celebrations. Most cranberry sauces are high in sugar, containing approximately 52 grams per serving. When making this delicious side for the holiday, use less sugar and substitute the rest for other flavor enhancers such as cinnamon or orange zest! The standard portion size for cranberry sauce is ½ cup and is packed with antioxidants.

Pumpkin pie. The classic Thanksgiving dessert. One 9-inch slice of pumpkin pie is 280 calories and contains 46 grams of carbohydrates. It is also packed with vitamin A, an essential nutrient that is important for the immune system to function properly which is crucial for the colder months!

 

Written by: Shanell Fyle, Riverfront HyVee Dietetic Intern

References

How Many Calories Are in Thanksgiving Dinner? (2018, November 17). Retrieved October 25, 2019, from https://www.consumerreports.org/.

2019-11-04T15:40:38+00:00